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The Nelson Law Firm
South Carolina Tax Law Attorney

October 2019 Archives

A trust can provide flexibility in estate planning

Many South Carolina residents work long and hard to give themselves financial security during their working years and beyond, which includes, hopefully, a long, healthy and happy retirement. People are living longer, and retirement living is becoming more costly. Moreover, unexpected medical expenses can eat up sizeable chunks of money. However, if it is anticipated that an individual's estate assets will be considerable, estate planning becomes even more of a concern than it is for people with less property. Although a will can suffice as a means to designate which beneficiaries are to receive which estate assets, a trust can also do so but with more precision and control.

Modern family structures call for flexible estate planning

With the majority of families in South Carolina deviating from "traditional" (opposite-sex married partners with biological children), estate planning can become more complicated. People might have to consider whether or not their biological children and stepchildren will inherit similar amounts. Cohabiting couples might lack the same legal rights as legally married couples in the event of incapacity or death. Their estate plans would need to address issues that the law might not automatically cover. Modern developments in estate planning legal tools and language have emerged to help people in nontraditional families introduce flexibility into their plans and avoid unintentionally excluding loved ones.

What to know about special needs trusts

It may be easier for special needs individuals to retain access to government services if their assets are held in a trust. However, it is important that their South Carolina parents carefully structure the trust so that it is exempt from income and resource rules. Special needs trusts must irrevocable, for the benefit of only one person and can only pay for medical or dental needs not provided by other sources.

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