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Trusts for young beneficiaries

People in South Carolina who have young children should not limit their estate plan to just a will. In order to ensure that the assets they set aside for their children will be properly managed, the inclusion of a trust is necessary. A trust can be used to manage the assets so that they can be long-term resources for the intended beneficiaries.

How to protect a business through estate planning

Estate plans can help anyone protect assets or ensure that his or her final wishes are carried out. However, those who own businesses in South Carolina or anywhere else should have an estate plan in place to protect their companies. Creating a plan may help ensure that the surviving spouse will have the financial resources that he or she needs after the business owner dies or becomes incapacitated.

Why people should keep only one signed will

When people in South Carolina make a will, they may know just how important it is to keep a signed copy of this key estate document safe and secure. People make wills to determine how their assets will be distributed after they pass away. By planning for the future, they can specify the use of their property without relying on the state law standards. Estate planning is especially important for wealthy people, but it can help people of any means. Family members will find that dividing assets is an easier process if a clear, legal will is available, and they will generally spend less time and money in probate court.

Why a pour-over will can be important

People in South Carolina who are using a trust in their estate plan may also want to create a pour-over will. The purpose of a pour-over will is to place all assets not already in the trust or passed using other methods, such as beneficiary designations, into the trust.

Estate plans that should be updated

People in South Carolina who fail to regularly review their estate plan may do so for various reasons. They may be reluctant to talk about death or may be intimated by the complex documents or tax laws. However, an estate plan that is not properly up to date may not be efficient enough to ensure the assets of an estate are distributed as preferred by the estate's owner.

How to choose the right people for roles in an estate plan

When a South Carolina resident is creating an estate plan, there are many specifics to consider. For example, it's important to choose the right people for estate planning roles. One common problem is that multiple people may be appointed for responsibilities that overlap. This and other errors may cause conflict.

How to create an estate plan in the new year

The first month of the year is a great time for South Carolina residents and others to get their lives in order. For example, it can be a great time to create a savings account or finally get serious about meeting fitness goals. It can also be a great time to get serious about creating an estate plan. Ideally, a plan will include a will that dictates where assets go after a person dies.

Common estate planning errors to avoid

South Carolina residents who are creating estate plans should watch out for several common errors. For example, some estate owners forget to leave information where it can be easily found by executors or beneficiaries. It is best to make a complete list of all assets and their locations. This includes mortgage paperwork, information on bank accounts and paperwork associated with insurance policies. There are also sentimental assets that a person might want to identify. Furthermore, estate owners should not neglect digital assets.

The advantages of estate planning for young people

Although older people in South Carolina might realize at some point that they need to make final arrangements for their estates, young people could also prevent many difficulties by completing an estate plan. They might consider death far off or their estates insignificant, but estate plans could reduce problems when accidents leave young people incapacitated.

A business owner needs an estate plan more than most

When people die without executing a legal will or trust, control over what happens to their estate is relinquished. South Carolina has its own laws, as do all of the states, for what is known as intestate succession. Distribution of assets of the estate follows the statutory scheme without regard to the decedent's wishes.

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