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Common estate planning errors to avoid

South Carolina residents who are creating estate plans should watch out for several common errors. For example, some estate owners forget to leave information where it can be easily found by executors or beneficiaries. It is best to make a complete list of all assets and their locations. This includes mortgage paperwork, information on bank accounts and paperwork associated with insurance policies. There are also sentimental assets that a person might want to identify. Furthermore, estate owners should not neglect digital assets.

The advantages of estate planning for young people

Although older people in South Carolina might realize at some point that they need to make final arrangements for their estates, young people could also prevent many difficulties by completing an estate plan. They might consider death far off or their estates insignificant, but estate plans could reduce problems when accidents leave young people incapacitated.

A business owner needs an estate plan more than most

When people die without executing a legal will or trust, control over what happens to their estate is relinquished. South Carolina has its own laws, as do all of the states, for what is known as intestate succession. Distribution of assets of the estate follows the statutory scheme without regard to the decedent's wishes.

How to make a better estate plan

Estate owners in South Carolina have many options when it comes to wills and trusts. In some cases, they will choose to leave a portion of their assets to charity and a portion to their children. If a person chooses to structure their estate plan in such a fashion, it is important to consider the tax implications of how assets are actually transferred.

Why it is important to have an estate plan

South Carolina fans of the musician Prince might know that he did not have a will, and as a result, his estate has been tied up in probate. Aretha Franklin has also died without an estate plan. According to one of her attorneys, he urged her to make one but she simply did not get around to it.

A quick guide to micro estate planning

Financially concerned people in South Carolina are well aware of the long-term benefits that come with careful estate planning. Taxes can be lowered, assets can be protected and families can get some peace of mind. However, many estate owners forget about the short-term circumstances that could arise directly following a tragedy. For example, what happens to a child in the immediate aftermath of a parent's death before a court enforces the guardianship provisions can be written out in an estate plan.

How to plan for old age when living alone

Roughly 19.5 million of the people who live alone in South Carolina and other states are age 65 and older. While some people prefer their independence, a spouse or child can act as a caregiver as an individual gets older. Absent the support that family members can provide, it is important for older people to create estate plans that meet their needs. Part of this plan is to save as much money as possible while still a part of the workforce.

The dangers of picking the wrong executor

You gave careful thought to what you want your will to accomplish. You made sure all the terms of your will are consistent with your wishes. Even if you've done all these things, the probate process could still end up going very differently than you would have wanted if you make a critical mistake in your will. This mistake is picking the wrong executor.

When a will is not enough

Many people living in South Carolina understand the importance of having a will. What they may not understand, however, is that a will is just the start of a comprehensive estate plan. While wills are helpful in ensuring that a deceased person's wishes regarding asset distribution are respected, other documents and plans are necessary to protect the interests of both the individual making the estate plan as well as their dependents.

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